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Victorian golf medal 1889 Cupar Thomas Lumsden Brown William Watson

A Victorian golf medal awarded to William Watson on 20th April 1889 by Cupar golf club for a match played at Ladybank. The medal is marked by Thomas Lumsden Brown of Cupar.
Price: £1995.00

William Watson (1860-1941) won the handicap competition at the Cupar Golf Club, of which he was secretary, on 20th April 1889. The match was reported in the Dundee Advertiser of the 22nd April 1889:

'Cupar Club.— The annual meeting of the Cupar Golf Club held in the Royal Hotel, Ladybank, on Saturday afternoon. There was good number of members present, and, after the usual preliminary business had been duly gone over, Mr George Wallace was elected Captain for the ensuing year. It was also settled that the members the Club should play for the Peripatetic Cup over the Links the Leven Golf Club on the Queen’s Birthday. The players then adjourned to the course at Annsmuir, Ladybank, to play in the spring competition for the medal and several sweepstakes, the former being scratch and the latter handicap. The course presented lively appearance, many couples engaging in the competition. The weather was good, but owing to the bad gusty wind which swept across the course from the West it was rather difficult put on a good score. However, some splendid play was exhibited, and was witnessed by the onlookers with great interest. At the close of thecompetition it was found that Mr J. C. Watson and William Watson, Secretary of the Club, had tied with the fine score of 87 strokes. The tie was played off, the result being that Mr William Watson was declared the winner of the medal, beating his opponent by 1 stroke. The next best scores registered were : —Mr Samuel W. Johnstone, 88; Mr J. H. Wilson, and Henry Matthew, 98. The sweepstake competition was engaged in at the same time, with the following result:—l Mr Hugh 8. Robson, 2 Mr W. Brawn, 3 Mr Samuel W. Johnstone, 4 Mr J. H. Wilson.'

William Watson (1860-1941) was born at his family's cottage in Kemback (8 miles from St. Andrews). His father John Cox Watson, also his partner in this round of golf, was a flax spinner and became a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club in St. Andrews in 1869. William was educated at Madras College (now Bell Baxter High School) in Cupar and then attended the University of St. Andrews for a year from 1876-1877. After this he returned to work for his father.

When not employed William shared his father's passion for golf and played under 'Old Tom' Morris in St. Andrews, as well as at his home course of Cupar. In 1892 he showed his first interest in course design when he designed the course at Hexham in Northumberland. Through his interest in golf Watson became friends with David Forgan (1856-1931) who both founded the Forgan Golf Company of St. Andrews and became a succesful banker in Minneapolis and President of the First National Bank of Chicago. It was either on Forgan's advice or on the recommendation of Judge Martin B. Koon of Minneapolis who had met Watson when both played at St. Andrews, perhaps both, that Watson boarded the RMS Etruria in Liverpool in October 1898 and arrived in Chicago by the end of the year. He was soon joined there by his father and younger brother.

By April 1899 Watson had been appointed to oversee the creation of the Minikhada Golf Club in Minneapolis and he went on to design over 100 courses in 14 states, including 71 in California. A full list of the courses Watson designed and more information about Watson's professional career can be found online.

In 1906 Watson had married Ada Grace Sanborn from Hebron, New Hampshire and in 1913 she took over formal responsibility for the family golf equipment company, taking it from one room to seven rooms in 1922. She also had a hand in the logistics of the golf course construction business. She was photographed with her husband under the heading 'An executive wife'.

The Wall Street crash of 1929 and the Great depression put paid to many projects Watson was working on (including his last original design for El Sobrante golf course in Pasadena). He redesigned the existing courses at the Montecito Country Club in Santa Barbara and Charlevoix golf club in Michigan in 1930. He then divided his time between Los Angeles and Charlevoix and died on September 2nd 1941.

Although Watson's most enduring physical legacy is the restored course at the Diablo Country Club in San Francisco Bay, Dean Knuth wrote of him that:

'Watson embraced a minimalist design philosophy, where golf holes were found and not built. He
disliked
artificiality. Every bunker and mound he constructed had a purpose. Some shapes were
simple, others more complex, but always he insisted on naturalness.


William Watson was
a significant pioneer in bringing the game to enthusiastic American golfers.
It is time for more of today’s golfers to recognize
him for his accomplishments.'


8531
Fireman's badge

A large fireman's badge for an armband depicting the Royal Exchange, with coronet above, by Reily and Storer, London 1837 inscribed "ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE 1720". The back is inscribed with a name.
Price:SOLD

 The building burned down in 1837.                    

1885
Two Victorian school medals Sir John Cass London 1874 1876

Two Victorian medals issued by the Sir John Cass School to Edward Ackers for Good Arithmetic in 1875 (hallmarked 1874 by RH- possibly Robert Hennell) and Elizabeth Ann Loyd for Good Writing in 1877 (hallmarked 1876 by RH- possibly Robert Hennell ).
Price: £795.00

Sir John Cass (1661-1718) was a wealthy merchant, a prominent Citizen of London (rising to the rank of Sherriff in 1711 when he was also Master of the Carpenters Company), a Member of Parliament for the City of London from 1713-1715. He was also treasurer of the Bridewell and Bethlem Hospitals in the City from 1709-1715, one of the Commissioners for increasing the number of churches to cater for the spiritual needs of the rising population of London from 1711, knighted by Queen Anne in 1712 and Master of the Skinners in 1714.

John Cass had founded a school in the church of St. Bodolph's, Aldersgate in 1709 but when ill in 1718 he sought to leave further funds to the school. He was, however, not able to complete signing his will in time and some of his heirs contested it. The school did continue until 1738 under the patronage of Lady Cass and another of the original trustees. However in 1748 the provisions of Sir John Cass's will were upheld and an Act of Parliament was passed establishing a permanent endowment for the school. This endowment funded both the existing school (now the Aldgate School), a secondary school (now Stepney All Saints School) and the Sir John Cass Faculty of Art, Architecture and Design (parts of which are now part of London Metropolitan University and the Cass Business School). The charity has also contributed to the University of East London in Stratford.

Among the pupils of the original school founded by Cass in the 1870s were Edward Ackers (1862-1909) and Elizabeth Ann Lloyd (1863-1948). Both were born in East London and, as is proven by these medals, educated in the 'Foundation of Sir John Cass Knight'. By the 1881 census Edward was an India Rubber Salesman living at 9 Worley Court, Aldgate with the rest of his family and Elizabeth was a Domestic Servant in the home of John G. Glover of 8 Upper Chadwell Street, Clerkenwell.

On 20th December 1885 the couple married at St. Bodolph's, Aldersgate and by the 1891 census the family were living at 48 Offord Road, Islington and had two children Nellie and Thomas. By 1901 the couple were at 23 Station Road in Finchley accompanied by sons Thomas and George. Sadly Edward died in 1909 and was buried in St. Marylebone Cemetery on 11th March. In her widowhood Elizabeth is recorded as a boarding house keeper, living at 7 Falkland Avenue in Finchley from 1910 until at least 1939. When she died in 1948 she was living at 31 Green Lane, Belper in Derbyshire and left an estate of £164 17s 2d. She was also buried in St. Marylebone Cemetery.

 


8429z
silver medal Charles II Catherine of Braganza marriage 1662

A silver medallion commemorating the marriage of Charles II and Catherine of Braganza, c.1662.

Price: £695.00

In 1662 Catherine of Braganza (1638-1705), daughter of King John IV of Portugal, arrived in England as the consort of the recently restored Charles II. As part of her dowry Great Britain gained Tangier and Bombay (along with trading concessions with Portugal and a sum of £300,000). She also appears to have been responsible for popularising tea drinking in her new home.

When Charles II died in 1685 Catherine returned to Portugal and served as a key adviser to her brother Peter II, serving as Regent in 1701 and 1704-1705. Her name is recorded for posterity in the United States - the borough of Queens in New York was so named while she was Queen of England.

7622
Pair of medals

A matched pair of medals - one silver the other base metal - by Thomas Pingo of London 1774, depicting Peter Muilman and his wife Mary and their home on the occasion of their fortieth wedding anniversary, and a print showing Kirby Hall, their home .
Price: £650.00

 Further details about these unusual medals may be found here

4433
Pair of  medallions

A pair of oval medallions inscribed for entry to an "ASSEMBLY" and "CONCERT", also engraved with the name 'Dr. Jeans', circa 1800.
Price:SOLD

There are a number of possible owners of these medallions in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries (all closely related):

Joshua Jeans DD (1743- 1807) who held livings in Cornwall as well as presiding over the English Episcopal Church at Amsterdam.
Thomas Jeans MD (1747-1824) who practised medicine at Christchurch (Hants), Salisbury and Southampton.
Thomas Jeans DD (1743-1835) who received his Doctorate in 1816 and held the living of St. John's Maddermarket, Norwich for 50 years.

5292
Charles I token marriage Henrietta Maria 1625

A Charles I token commemorating the marriage of the King to Henrietta Maria, daughter of Henry IV of France in 1625.

Price: £425.00

Charles I (1600-1649) was the younger son of James I of England and VI of Scotland (1567-1625). Following the death of his elder brother Henry (b. 1594) Charles inherited the thrones of Great Britain from his father in 1625. In the same year Charles married Princess Henrietta Maria (1609-1669), daughter of Henry IV of France. The King and Queen went on to have four sons and five daughters. Following the outbreak of civil war in his kingdoms in 1640 Charles was executed in 1649 and the Queen went in to exile in France but returned to Britain when her eldest son was restored to his throne, as Charles II, in 1660.

 


8698
Edward VII school medal Inverness Fergusson and McBean

An engraved school medal, by Fergusson and McBean of Inverness, awarded by the London Inverness-shire Association to Catherine Taylor Dux of Inverness High Public School in 1903.
Price: £325.00
The London Invernessshire Association was one of a number of institutions founded in the 19th century to promote economic development in the Scottish Highlands. This medal was presented by them to the Dux (outstanding student) at the High Public School in Inverness. In 1903, it was awarded to Catherine Taylor then aged 15. In the 1901 census she was listed as at 7 Douglas Row in Inverness. She appears there along with her parents James (aged 57) and Jessie (aged 55) , her older sister Mary (aged 19) and two further relatives Annabella MacDonald (aged 47) and Ann MacDonald (aged 86).
A 'pretty terraced cottage' three doors away from the Taylor's former home is now a 2 bedroom holiday let.

7216
Victorian medal Royal Exchange 1844

A Victorian medal commemorating the opening of the Royal Exchange by Queen Victoria in 1844 (with armorials on the reverse and Queen Victoria on the obverse) in the original velvet lined leather case, 1844.
Price: £295.00

The building of a Royal Exchange to act as the centre of commerce for the City of London had been suggested in 1562, on the same model as the bourse in Antwerp. However it was not until 1571 that the first purpose built building, orchestrated by Sir Thomas Gresham, was opened by Elizabeth I. This was destroyed in the Great Fire of London and another building, on the same site, was opened in 1669. This building also succumbed to fire in 1838 and in 1842 the first stone of the new building was laid by Prince Albert. It was completed in 1844, opened by Queen Victoria and still stands today. The arms on the reverse of this medal are those of the City, Sir Thomas Gresham and the Mercers' Company.

 

 

7993z
medal Edinburgh midwife Duncan 1866

A circular medal with reeded border and mounts modelled as thistles, by Mackay and Chisholm Edinburgh circa 1866, engraved Midwifery Lecturer J. Matthews Duncan M.D. and Adjudged to Archibald Walker Edinburgh July 1866.
Price: £275.00

James Matthews Duncan (1826-1890) had graduated in medicine from both Aberdeen and Edinburgh unversities before his 21st birthday. Following further studies on the continent and under leading Edinburgh-based surgeon James Young Simpson (1811-1870), Duncan began to build up a practice as an obstetrician. He gave lectures outside the university curriculum and in 1861 was made physician to the ward for diseases of women at the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. He moved to London after St. Bartholomew's Hospital invited him to be lecturer in midwifery and obstetric physician in 1877. Among many other honours, Duncan was elected to the Royal Society in 1883. During his career Duncan published a number of influential books on obstetrics and his name became associated with a number of obstetrical instruments and techniques.

6764
George V shooting medal Bisley 1929 Humphrey Cup Munsey

A George V shooting medal in the form of a cross with the arms of the universities of Oxford and Cambridge assayed in 1929 by Munsey and Company of Cambridge, engraved {Bisley 1929/ Humphrey Cup Match/ E. R. Heathcote}.  It is in the original Munsey & Company leather case.
Price: £250.00

The Humphrey Cup Match is a rifle shooting competition held annually at Bisley, with four competitors from the universities of Cambrisge and Oxford.  It is now shot over distances of 1000, 1100 and 1200 yards, although in 1929 the distances were 900, 1000 and 1100 yards.  Cambridge won the 1929 match with a score of 825 against Oxford’s 822.  E R Heathcote was a member of the winning Cambridge team, although he had the lowest individual score of all eight competitors that year. Edgar Ronald Heathcote (1907-1972) went on to join the family architectural firm founded by and named after his grandfather- Charles Heathcote and Sons. Edgar married Olga Murray Leslie (1911-2007) at St. George's Church on Hanover Square, London in 1933 and had a son, Colin, and a daughter, Jean.

 


8481z
Victorian school medal Foyle College Londonderry 1856

A Victorian school medal issued by Foyle College to W. J. Franks, June 1856.
Price: £245.00

Foyle College can trace its origins back to 1617 and the Free Grammar School founded on Society Street, within the City walls of Derry, by Matthias Springman. In 1814, following legal wrangles about funding and the right to appoint the Headmaster, the school moved to a larger purpose built school on a hill above the Strand, just outside the City walls. The new building was designed by John Bowden, who was also responsible for the Court house in Derry.

It was at this time that the School was renamed 'Foyle College'- a name reputedly suggested by George Fletcher Moore, then one of the Boarders and future prominent voluntary settler in Western Australia, and seconded by his fellow students. In 1898 Foyle College merged with the rival Londonderry Academic Institution (founded 1868) and . The resulting school had the use of the endowments and buildings of both schools and went on to absorb the Londonderry High School in 1976 as well. The combined school (now relocated to the site of the former US Naval Communications station) and, although legally Foyle and Londonderry College, kept the name and traditions of Foyle College.

Famous Alumni include George Fletcher Moore, Major General James Gwyn of the Union Army , and Sir Michael Alexander (former British Ambassador to NATO). Sadly the school records for the 1850s are not extant so that the achievements of W. J. Franks are unknown.

8119
Victorian Ladies Literate in Arts Badge St. Andrews Edinburgh 1893 Christie and Kirkpatrick

A Victorian Ladies Literate in Arts badge from St. Andrews University, by Christie and Kilpatrick, Edinburgh 1893.
Price: £245.00


In 1877, St. Andrews became the first university in Scotland to admit women. It did so under a scheme called 'Ladies Literate in Arts' (LLA) that allowed women to study to degree level by distance-learning. The qualification covered a wide range of subjects, including geography, mathematics, moral philosophy, chemistry and fine art, as well as various ancient and modern languages. In 1881, Professor William Angus Knight, convener of the LLA committee, ensured exact parity with the MA taken by male students — having the same exam papers taken at the same time. In 1883 academic dress was added to the LLA (a sash made from the same fabric and colours as the MA hood). In 1892, the University allowed the first female undergraduates to study for an MA but the LLA did not lose its appeal and was only discontinued in the 1930s.

7962
Antique silver school medal

A cast school medal 2.5 inches diameter circa 1851, with heavy leaf-encrusted border marked "J. Law"
depicting a head 'IN MEMORIAM OBIIT MDCCCLI' and, on reverse, 'Numisma Moirianum Carolo H. Mein. Puero Optime Merito condiscipulorum in Schola Campiensi, Duci Donatum Praeceptore, A BALFOUR, MDCCLXIV'.
Price: £240.00

This medal for "Best Boy" is given by A. Balfour, Headmaster — a noted botanist. The medal was given to commemorate David MacBeth Moir, also known as Delta, author and physician — who also wrote a 'Memoir of Alexander Balfour'. A very similar label also by John Law is depicted in Grimshaw's 'Silver Medals from Scottish and Irish Schools'

8327
James I gambling token Van De Pass Elector Palatine Winter King

A gaming token depicting Frederick, Elector Palatine of the Rhine (1596-1632) made in London circa 1620 by Simon Van De Pass.
Price: £225.00

Frederick, Elector Palatine (1596-1632) inherited the family lands of the Palatinate of the Rhine in 1610 and married Princess Elizabeth, daughter of James I of England, in 1613. Frederick was a prominent member of the Protestant party in the predominantly Catholic Holy Roman Empire ruled by the Habsburgs and in 1619 accepted the Crown of Bohemia in the Protestant interest. Sadly the Catholic claimant to the throne, and head of the Habsburg family, was elected Holy Roman Emperor in 1619 (with Frederick's being the only vote against him). The fighting that these events caused was one of the immediate sparks that caused what became known as the Thirty Years War. Frederick held Bohemia for two years before losing control of it and all his ancestral lands. He died in 1632.

This token was produced by noted engraver Crispin Van De Pass (1564-1637) in London in the early 1620s when, due to his being the son-in-law of the King and his Protestantism, Frederick was a popular figure. His son Prince Rupert went on to be the most charismatic Royalist cavalry commander of the British Civil Wars.

 


8362
A George III Proof 6d Soho mint 1797

A George III Proof halfpenny produced by Matthew Boulton at his Soho works in 1799.
Price: £225.00

The earliest halfpenny seems to have been produced in the early 13th century and the denomination was only abandoned on the change to decimal coinage in 1971. By the 18th century the shortage of small change was giving the country significant cause for concern. Allegedly by 1780, only 8% of copper coins in circulation were genuine. To combat counterfeiting in 1797 The Royal Mint contracted Matthew Boulton to produce copper coinage in Birmingham.

8191
rowing medal London 1862 William Neal Ariel Corsair Clubs

A Victorian rowing prize engraved 'Commemoration medal of Four oar'd match, Ariel & Corsair Clubs, 5th July 1862' and 'Won by ARC, R. G. Fisher No. 2' by William Neal London 1862 .
Price: £225.00

On July 6, 1862 The Era, one of a number of daily newspapers circulating in London at the time, reported that there had been a 'Four Oared race between the Ariel and Corsairs Rowing clubs' the day before. It had been staged from 'Putney to Chiswick, accompanied by two steam boats, one chartered by either club. A good race had been looked for at first, but subesequently, when it became known that the Corsairs had had some difficulty in getting their crew together, odds were laid on the Ariels finishing at something like 2 to 1. The Ariels were on the Surrey shore, and dashed away with the lead. Their rowing was much superior to that of their opponents, and although these rowed very pluckily all through, they were unable to come near the Ariels, who won in a canter'. The newspaper then detailed the crews — including R. G. Fisher. This race was one of a number between these two amateur rowing clubs, in which all of the reported victories were gained by the Ariels.

6891
Bronze medal Mary II death 1694

A William III copper medal commemorating the death of Mary II, circa 1694 .
Price: £200.00

 When James II fled England in 1688, he was taken to have abdicated his throne. His eldest daughter and his son-in-law and nephew, William, Prince of Orange, became joint monarchs as Mary II and William III. Mary died of smallpox in 1694 and William ruled alone until his death in 1702 when he was succeeded by Mary's younger sister Anne.

6890
Jernegan medal

A Jernegan medal inscribed on front 'GROWING ARTS ADORN EMPIRE — CAROLINE PROTECTING 1736' and on obverse 'BOTH HANDS FILLd FOR BRITAIN — GEORGE REIGNING'. This medal was a prize in an eighteenth century lottery.
Price:SOLD

Arguably the most important piece of eighteenth century silver in the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg is the 'Jernengan Wine Cistern' made in around 1735 by Frederick Kandler (of which there are copies in the Victoria and Albert and the Metropolitan Museums). This monumental piece of silver was commissioned by Littleton Poyntz Meynell from Henry Jernengan but when it was completed he did not accept it and in due course it was disposed of via a lottery (the smaller prizes being medals and the first prize, the cistern). The cistern was won by a Major William Battine, who had bought 7 tickets and also won six medals. He had sold the cistern to Empress Elizabeth of Russia by 1740.

5086
Antique silver school medal

A school medal from Great Campden House Christmas 1839 given to a Miss Parke
Price: £130.00

According to M.E. Grimshaw, this school is the successor to Campden House Boarding School in Hampstead, London.

9690
Sixpenny token

A sixpence token for York (Yorkshire), 1811:

Obverse: Arms of the city between olive and palm branches. Legend, YORK 1811. There are four berries in the olive branch. The stem of the palm is over the first one in date.
Reverse: CATTLE AND BARBER An ornament above and below. Legend SIX PENCE SILVER TOKEN. The top of B in BARBER lines to the centre of the S in Silver.
Price: £110.00

 NOTES: Cattle and Barber were goldsmiths and jewellers in Coney Street, York. “An issue of silver tokens has been made by Messrs. Cattle and Barber of York. These tokens are of the value of Shillings and Sixpences, and are finished in a neat style, bearing on one side the arms of York, and on the other, their value, with the names of the issuers.”- Chronicle, Oct. 12, 1811.
References: Dalton – Yorkshire York 71, Boyne 234.

2565
1834 sixpence

A silver sixpence in superb condition, 1834.
Price: £110.00

5193
Counter 1798 A plain counter engraved 'Fear God' and on the reverse, 'WC Morpeth June 14th 1798'; unmarked.
Price: £110.00
8571
Jernegan medal A Jernegan medal with on front an image of Queen Caroline 'GROWING ARTS ADORN EMPIRE - CAROLINE PROTECTING' and on obverse 'BOTH HANDS FILLd FOR BRITAIN - GEORGE REIGNING' 1736.
Price: £95.00
3832
George III conder token for 1 shilling York 1811 Cattle Barber

A George III shilling token for York (Yorkshire), 1811:

Obverse: Arms of the city between olive and palm branches. Legend, YORK 1811. There are four berries in the olive branch. The stem of the palm is over the first one in date.
Reverse: CATTLE AND BARBER An ornament above and below. Legend SHILLING SILVER TOKEN. The top of B in BARBER lines to the centre of the S in Silver.
Price: £85.00

 NOTES: Cattle and Barber were goldsmiths and jewellers in Coney Street, York. “An issue of silver tokens has been made by Messrs. Cattle and Barber of York. These tokens are of the value of Shillings and Sixpences, and are finished in a neat style, bearing on one side the arms of York, and on the other, their value, with the names of the issuers.”- Chronicle, Oct. 12, 1811.
References: Dalton – Yorkshire York 71, Boyne 234.

7266

 

Sixpenny token

Sixpence token for Fazeley (Staffordshire), 1811:

Obverse: Arms of the Harding family; FAZELEY SILVER TOKEN 1811 PAYABLE BY PEELS HARDING & CO.
Reverse: 6 pence within a wreath; the centre limb of the last E in pence is clear of the top and bottom of that letter.
Price:SOLD
References:Dalton - Staffordshire - Bilston 11, Boyne 78.

2523
Penny circa 1250 A Henry III silver penny circa 1250.
Price: £75.00
3920
George III copper advertising token Low's Grand Hotel Covent Garden 1774 Kirk

A copper advertising token for Low's Grand Hotel, Covent Garden by John Kirk London 1774
Price: £70.00

In 1773 a 55 year lease on 43 King Street, Covent Garden was taken out in 1773 by David Low at £200 per year. The house, formerly the residence of the Edward Russell, Earl of Orford, appears in a 1738 image by William Hogarth. Low, formerly a peruke maker in Covent Garden, opened the house as Low's Grand Hotel in 1774 with a top price of 15s a night for a suite of two rooms (7 days wages for a skilled tradesman). The hotel was described as 'the only Hotel for Families on your Grace's estate . . . being fitted up in a Stile of Elegance for the reception of the Nobility and Gentry requiring temporary residence in Town'. Unfortunately these improvements came at a cost (£6000 or £7000 at Low's estimation) and Low became bankrupt in 1786.

The property continued in mixed occupation with part of it serving as the first headquarters of the Royal Institute of British Architects from 1835-1837 and in the 1840s another part was a hotel run by actor and singer W. C. Evans. From the 1870s the building housed a number of clubs: from 1874-1875 the Savage Club, from 1882-1883 John Hollingshead's Falstaff Club, from 1884-1890 the New Club and 1891-1929 the National Sporting Club. It is now the London flagship store of clothing retailer L. K. Bennett.

 

8160
Elizabeth II pendant St. George's Chapel 1975

An Elizabeth II Commemorative pendant made to commemorate the 500th Anniversary of the foundation of St. George's Chapel, Windsor made in London in 1975.
Price: £65.00

St. George's Chapel in Windsor was founded in 1348 by Edward III and from its inception has been the spiritual home of the Order of the Garter (founded the same year). In 1475 Edward IV initiated a monumental reconstruction of the chapel that would be completed by his cousin and son-in-law, Henry VII, in 1528. Although small changes have been made to the building in the interim the magnificent structure that can be visited today is fundamentally the building envisioned by Edward IV and Henry VII. This pendant was created to commemorate the 500th Anniversary of that architectural project.


8479z
Elizabeth II pendant St. George's Chapel 1975

An Elizabeth II Commemorative pendant made to commemorate the 500th Anniversary of the foundation of St. George's Chapel, Windsor made in London in 1975.
Price: £65.00

St. George's Chapel in Windsor was founded in 1348 by Edward III and from its inception has been the spiritual home of the Order of the Garter (founded the same year). In 1475 Edward IV initiated a monumental reconstruction of the chapel that would be completed by his cousin and son-in-law, Henry VII, in 1528. Although small changes have been made to the building in the interim the magnificent structure that can be visited today is fundamentally the building envisioned by Edward IV and Henry VII. This pendant was created to commemorate the 500th Anniversary of that architectural project.


8480z
  medal

A base metal medal made in 1829 depicting the copy of the Warwick vase created by Sir Edward Thomason in 1820.
Price: £65.00

The original Warwick vase was discovered in Italy in 1770 and its form was often copied for use in silver objects. In 1820, Sir Edward Thomason, a leading Birmingham goldsmith and manufacturer, created a large scale copy (commemorated in this medal) which was acquired by the University of Cambridge in 1842 and still stands on the Senate House Lawn there.

3385
bronze medal Francis Henry Egerton 8th Earl of Bridgewater by Donadio circa 1823

A George IV bronze portrait medal of 'Francis Henry Egerton Earl of Bridgewater', by Donadio circa 1823.
Price: £40.00

This medal was struck to commemorate the accession to the Earldom of Bridgewater of Francis Henry Egerton (1756-1829) as 8th Earl of Bridgewater in 1823. The 7th Earl, Egerton's elder brother John William had inherited the Bridgewater Estates, from their cousin, the 6th Earl, a noted great builder of canals in the late eighteenth century died without a male heir in 1803.

Francis Henry Egerton died childless in 1829 and bequeathed his valuable 'Egerton Collection' of manuscripts relating to French and Italian literature to the British Museum along with £12,000 to fund further purchases. He also left £8,000 to the Royal Society to fund 'the best work on the Goodness of God as manifested in the creation' (the outcome is now known as The Bridgewater Treatises). Egerton was a notable eccentric: at his residence in Paris his many cats and dogs were dressed as Ladies and Gentlemen, taken out in his carriage, fed at his table and censured if their behaviour was not suitable.

7084
School medal An oval school medal in base metal, for Acton County School showing the arms as 3 scimitars beneath a coronet and the motto PACTUM SERVA, circa 1920.
Price: £35.00
1768
  badge A silver-gilt and enamel Treasurer's badge for the Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes, by L. Simpson & Co, London 1925 inscribed on reverse: PRESENTED TO BRO J. LINTON (Host) FOR SERVICES RENDERED AS TREASURER. 23rd Sept 1925.
Price: £28.00
2167
  medal A base metal medallion comemorating the 1862 International Exhibition .
Price: £25.00
3386